Fender ultimate chorus dating

They are all very rare today and few have survived.

The first amplifiers made in-house by Fender is the Woodie series, built in 1946 through 1948.

Namely, the introduction of the stand-alone spring reverb unit in 1961, followed by the subsequent incorporation of the reverb circuit within a combo-amp design with the 1963 Vibroverb.

Other notable accomplishments of this period include the shift of the top-of-the-line model from the traditional Twin-Amp to include other models, like the Vibrasonic Amp in early 1960, as well as the blonde Showman Amp in 1961.

Two different colors of grillclothes were featured on the blondes, oxblood and wheat.

There are several experimental Fender Tweed amps in blonde.

At the beginning of the "tweed" era, Fender constructed many of its cabinets in "TV front" style, changing around 1950 predominantly to the"wide panel", where the top and bottom panel is wider than the side.

The twill was first used in 1946 on the Dual Professional a twin 10" 6L6 powered model of which only 400 were made before being renamed "the Super Amp" in 1948.

These early models are commonly referred to as "TV-Fronts" due to the shape of the cabinet when viewed from above.

These were considered a step above the student models (Champ, Harvard, Princeton) which remained tweed-covered in 1960.

Grillclothes were initially the same as those used in the previous tweed era (i.e.: maroon with gold stripe).

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